After 1929

 

After taking on The Globe in Derby in 1930, Tom and Gertie King, with Irene in tow, moved around the Midlands area, never returning to run pubs in Yorkshire.

                                            Irongate, Derby

                                  The Jorrocks (formerly the Globe)

They kept The Globe until 1934 before moving to The Weddington Hotel in Nuneaton, where they were during the Jubilee Period.

 

                                  The Weddington Hotel 1935

Between 1936 and 1938 they were at The Black Boy, 79 St Saviours Road, Leicester, and then they moved out of the city at the start of the war to The Boot at Grendon near Tamworth in Staffordshire, thinking it a better bet to be away from cities.

                            The Boot Inn, Watling Street, Grendon

  The Boot was a country pub on the main Watling Street, and part of the Morgan's Brewery of Tamworth chain as had been The Weddington.  It was well frequented by American soldiers from a nearby base and trade was good, as the area was also a firm mining stronghold, with lots of mines continuing production throughout the war. 

Irene King married James Albert Morgan (of the brewery family) whilst living at The Boot, in May 1941, and continued to live there with her parents until after the war.  Jim liked the army life, and wanted to stay in the army but was persuaded otherwise.  He went on to join the TA and disappear regularly throughout the years on TA activities.  He also went back to being a surveyor at a business he owned called Sanders and Freeman, Guildhall Lane,  Leicester, and bought two plots of land in Leicester, one near Grace Road cricket ground, and one about a mile from Abbey Park in Leicester.  Preferring himself to live near the cricket ground, as he was a keen cricketer, he was somewhat upset when Irene decided she wanted to live on Somerset Avenue near Abbey Park, and a house was designed and built.

                                  53 Somerset Avenue, Leicester

During the period of the build, they bought a house round the corner from Somerset Avenue at 19 Burnham Drive and when the house on Somerset Avenue was finished, decided to let it out for a while as by that time, I had come onto the scene, and moving seemed a little daunting.  We stayed in Burnham Drive far longer than anticipated because the tenants at Somerset Avenue, a teacher and his family, refused to move out.  Eventually we moved into Somerset Avenue in 1957, sold off part of the garden for another house to be built, and stayed in the house that my dad designed.  Irene King died at 53 Somerset Avenue on 6th January 1980 of emphysema.

Despite saying she didn't like public life in her 1929 diary, my mother really missed the pub scene and the interaction with patrons and often said so.  She found being on her own with a child whilst her husband was at work very lonely, as she was an outgoing person and had never been in a private house in her life.

She eventually took on voluntary work weighing babies at the local mother and toddler clinic on Buckminster Road at the chapel there, where she worked as a volunteer once a week for over 25 years.  By the time she finished, children she had seen at the start were bringing their own children in. 

The house in Somerset Avenue was only a stone's throw from Leicester Speedway, and Mum and I used to go every week to see the racing, both in the days of The Hunters and then The Lions and from 1971, Mum took over running the John Boulger fan club which I had started.  Tom and Gertie King also used to come to the speedway in the days of The Hunters, and we paid for a table each year in the club house, so we were in a bar environment to watch the racing. 

 

              Notes
 

          Irene and Mick

In 1930 outside the Globe, Irongate, Derby

 

Left and below left:

Modern views of Irongate Derby

 

 

 

 

Number 41, The Globe, now re-named the Jorrocks is on the left, in between Lloyds Bank and Foulds music shop which is at number 40 Irongate

 

 

Pictures from Google Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Weddington Hotel in 1935

During the Silver Jubilee of George V

 

The King's Silver Jubilee Message to the Empire

May 6th 1935

 

Pathe News

 

 

For much more about the Weddington

Visit: Weddington Grove

 

Also visit: Derelict Places

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Boot Inn Grendon

picture from Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Irene & James Morgan

On their engagement in 1939

 

 

 

 

 

 

      The Morgan Family

James, Irene, and daughter Nita

 

 

 

Irene (centre) with other baby clinic volunteers in 1966

 

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